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Art smarts

Categories: Events, Learning things, Useful/interesting

Art > Marketing > Family > Funds cycle

The other week I went along to an AMA Network event.

It was good. Though I don't work directly in arts marketing, I thought Sarah Gee's talk on how marketing and development teams could and should work together, pooling resources and wisdom, was fascinating. (And worded/explained much more entertainingly than that.)

It was so interesting that I've been meaning to write it up – but have consistently failed to find the time to do so properly, so on the off-chance there are any nuggets of wisdom discernible from my notes (made after-the-fact, tut-tut) here they are:

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Arts orgs having to become more business-like in terms of 'customer retention'. No resting on laurels and becoming complacent because funding appears year after year; those days are over.

It's important to involve people from the organisation as a whole – and to be more open. And open to change.

Don't be shy about the fact the org is a charity. Nothing to be ashamed of! If people were more aware, they may be more inclined to give.

Don't concentrate on one route only. Crossover is vital e.g. capital appeals can help people understand an arts org. is a charity. [For example Hippo Stage Appeal which launched in the Prospectus we designed, aimed at key stakeholders and funders is now also a public-facing campaign.]

Being clear to audiences/donors about the organisation as a whole, not just individual projects. (A good point was made about the possibility of people becoming fatigued being frequently asked to fund individual 'projects' - that time/those resources should also be spent on long-term gains; building relationships with people who may eventually prove to be 'high value givers' or who bequeath a legacy.

Inform people about the organisation as a whole, as well as individual projects.

Interesting fact re. legacy-giving and inheritance tax – many people give away anything over the inheritance tax threshold as they don't appreciate being taxed for it again. Remember though – the 'baby boomers' may be the final legacy-givers as the rest of us may not have any money to bequeath! 

My favourite line: "Treat people as people". 

This is something the arts is very well-placed to do, particularly compared with corporates as so many people have and/or build emotional attachments with the arts; attachments which are much deeper and mean more to them than 'for profit' brands. Marketing plus development = the perfect range of skills to benefit organisations.

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By the way, the diagram heading up this post is based on a slide from Sarah's presentation but I can't for the life of me remember who this marketing/fundraising cycle should be credited to. If you know, please pop a note in the comments and I'll update the post accordingly. Ta.

UPDATE:
Thanks to Chris Unitt for reminding me that the marketing/fundraising cycle graphic concept is by Michael Kaiser. Chris has also handily pointed me towards a slideshare presentation about it: The Cycle.

Village in a Town (Hall)

Categories: Extra-curricular, Learning things

The Imagined Village logo - styled like a directional street sign

Having recently been appointed to the design roster of Town Hall Symphony Hall (yay!), last night we were invited along to meet the marketing team and then watch/listen to The Imagined Village at Town Hall.

Having first learned a bit about Performances Birmingham (the charity who run Town Hall and Symphony Hall) in the Joseph Hansom Suite – yes, he of 'Hansom Cab' fame was one of the Town Hall architects – we joined the rest of the audience for The Imagined Village.

They're a kind of folky, world-musicy supergroup; but the sort of act you might perhaps expect to find in a smaller venue than Town Hall. In fact this bigger venue worked perfectly as the auditorium was packed enough to feel atmospheric but small enough to still have something of an intimate feel to it. Plus the sound's everso good, the lighting's great … and the seats are comfy.

It's local-hall-gig-gone-large; in a good way. (In a standing ovation sort of way in this case.)

Until last night I'd not been to see live music for ages and had forgotten how much I enjoy it, so I'm now keeping my eyes peeled for something else to get me out of the office/house in the near future. (If any local venues are considering booking Los de Abajo, I can assure you, you'll have at least one person in the audience …)

Designy reflecting

Categories: Learning things, Our work

8th birthday celebration image, with an octopus and eight-shaped underwater vessel

Supercool are eight years old. Eight!

To mark this milestone, we've been reflecting on eight years of intelligent, well-considered and effective design. While we were doing our thing …

200430 St Mary Axe (The Gherkin) won the RIBA Stirling Prize.

2005Git was released.

2006 Twitter launched.

2007 – Apple unveiled the first iPhone.

2008 – Jos Buivenga designed the hugely popular Museo – a font for print and screen.

2009 'In Praise of Shadows' was part of the London Design Festival.

2010 Get Satisfaction won the 'Business' category of the SXSW Web Awards.

2011 – A Book Apart published 'Responsive Web Design' by Ethan Marcotte.

The first dance: unrelenting, bitter and stunning

Categories: Events, Extra-curricular, Learning things

Photo of Hofesh Shechter's Uprising by Andrew Lang

I was lucky enough to be invited to Dancexchange's 10th anniversary season launch and opening performance last night; a double bill by Hofesh Shechter Dance Company. Despite having seen plenty of dance on TV and online, until last night I'd never been to a live contemporary dance performance, so it was quite an experience.

The evening kicked-off with a pre-show drinks reception (in the same Hippodrome suite which houses the BRB Coppélia exhibition) and a talk from David Massingham, DanceXchange's Artistic Director. David reminisced about the work done by DanceXchange over the past ten years, and that of the various associate artists and choreographers who've developed work in the DanceXchange studios.

One such choreographer is Hofesh Shechter who created the first show of the season, Uprising, in the very same building in which it was about to be performed. Nice aptness.

Ear-plugs were provided

Performance time! Having been ushered into the Patrick Centre auditorium (via a man doling out earplugs which looked like sweets, as you can see), we took our seats and during the usual ambient chatter in what appeared to be a full house, the lights went out. They didn't fade; they went out. Suddenly. And completely. Which caused a few gasps.

Then the music started and I understood the earplugs thing; I could feel the booming, bassy, percussive, repetitive soundtrack in my feet.

I won't do a detailed recap of the entire show as I'm not a dance reviewer but Uprising was quite amazing. As far as the dancing goes, the fluidity between perfectly synchronised movement and faux-chaotic, faux-fighting was technically incredible.

Towards the end, the sound became a bit Amon Tobin, with electronic whirring, whizzes and twists – I subsequently learned that Shechter produces the music himself, which makes sense really as sound is an integral part of the performance. As is light. This was seamless; moving from single spots to moody half-light to bright, squint-worthy floodlights. Lee Curran clearly knows his stuff.

Afterwards, a single word seemed to describe Uprising: unrelenting.

During the interval the auditorium had been transformed from Uprising's raw, industrial space into a blank white canvas for The Art of Not Looking Back. A strangely oppositional match with Uprising – the style of dance fitted together but the tone this time was shrill and brittle, and included a screaming, spitting soundtrack which was uncomfortable listening.

The booming, brash, constancy of Uprising was clearly the male to this piece's stereotypically changeable, highly emotional and volatile female. (Not least because all Uprising's dancers are men and The Art of Not Looking Back is performed by women. Makes me wonder how it'd work performed vice versa …?)

A single word to describe The Art of Not Looking Back: bitter.

The performance ended with a literally awesome sequence in which both the female and male dancers became silhouetted and appeared to rewind at top speed through several of the core moves we'd just seen. It felt like watching a film being rewound, it was that convincing. Stunning stuff.

David Massingham running a Q&A with Hofesh Shechter

An interesting after-show Q&A followed, with David Massingham and the audience quizzing Hofesh about his creative process, what influences him and whether he minds other choreographers stealing from him. (He doesn't.)

There was even a point at which I thought Mr Massingham was about to reveal his favourite film is Love Actually. (He didn't. It was a Joni Mitchell song on the soundtrack he was referring to.)

So; that was my first experience of live contemporary dance. Would I go again? Yes. In fact, I'm off to see some sinister-looking dancing clowns next month. And I will be taking those earplugs, juuuuust incase …