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AMA keynote notes: Owen Hughes, Wolff Olins

Categories: Events, Inspiration, Learning things, Useful/interesting

Being a newbie to the AMA Conference, surrounded by people who all work in the same field – one very different from mine – meant I was a wee bit daunted, but this keynote could not’ve been more comforting.

Owen Hughes of Wolff Olins talked to us about what makes a game-changing brand.

Quote from the Wolff Olins website.

===

A sustained relationship with your audience comes from honest and open communication.

Long gone are the days of the hard sell. (People just don’t accept or respond to this anymore. More on this at the * …)

Brands must:
be clear about their purpose
be relevant to stakeholders
be shareable
be transparent
be a helpful guide

KNOW YOUR PURPOSE. [I’ve deliberately ‘shouted’ that bit as it’s super important. And, as with all the best advice, it’s simple.]

Understand how your stakeholders experience your organisation.

DISRUPT! [Yes, another important one. And familiar to us, with our branding and web work with Droplet.]

Be nimble; be unconventional; take risks.

*There’s a new mainstream, and these people are:
more connected
more demanding
more active
less acquisitive
less predictable

Apparently there are currently more over 50s than under 30s using social networks. I know! Whodathunk? [I don’t have the source for this stat.]

People want relevance; usefulness. And they no longer trust institutions. (Zoiks.)

People want platforms for self-expression and tools for sharing.

There’s no longer one way to do things, but as many ways as there are people in the audience.

People want the things they want, when they want them. Importantly; not when you want them to want them.

Brands need to move away from communications being ‘summoning’ to a more fluid
approach. From voice to visual. From synchronous to asynchronous. People want, and expect, things now.

People want to be able to change things themselves – and inventiveness thrives in difficult times.

People have changed – audience segmentation needs a re-think.

===

Owen talked us through several case studies, the clearest and I think most appropriate of which was Macmillan. (They also branded London 2012 but we don’t like to talk about the ‘endorsement shard’ around these parts – see the big pink blob over the nicely designed leaflet at the foot of the IDFB case study *winky face*)

Macmillan Cancer Care logo, and photos of fundraising kit which includes a sticker pack, collection box and branded balloons

Wolff Olins developed the Macmillan brand to be human – deliberately looking a bit handmade – approachable and flexible. For example: promo packs sent to fundraisers are a kit of parts which allows people to customise and adapt the identity as they see fit. Having fundraised for Macmillan in the past, I can confirm that the packs do indeed put the fun into fundraising for people who’re organising events. There’re stickers and everything.

I guess my only hesitation in bigging-up this brand too much is the fact that very few arts organisations have access to the sort of funds it’d cost to commission this level of branding from a world-renowned agency. Still; I do believe there are plenty of transferrable ideas about keeping a brand open, playful, adaptable – and focused on a defined key purpose – which apply to any and every organisation.

The main things to remember:
Be clear about your purpose. If you don’t know what you’re all about, how’s anyone else supposed to understand?

People want to feel, and to actually be, part of things. Be open and give them that opportunity.

Re-think audience segmentation.

And this is my favourite self-penned soundbite: Don’t preach – help people to navigate culture for themselves.

*UPDATE* I amended this post on 23/07/13 to correct the non-fact that the Macmillan work was done pro bono. It wasn't; however I am reliably informed that it was great value! So, another thing to add to my 'The main things to remember' list: Double check your facts. (And then check them again!)

I went to the AMA Conference and …

Categories: Events, Inspiration, Learning things, Useful/interesting

AMA Conference 2013 website header – Game Change

We work with a fair few people in the arts sector and, for several years now, I’ve been a member of the Arts Marketing Association. “Why?”, I hear you cry, “You’re no arts marketer!”

True. But the idea is that we can be more helpful and useful – i.e. better at our jobs – when we have a decent understanding of what it is the folks we work with actually do all day; their aims, wider objectives, challenges etc. to use some businessy-type speak. And, yes, we may even meet potential new clients while we’re at it; bonus.

(Another significant reason for joining is that I don’t believe it ever hurts to learn new things either professionally or personally.)

So, that’s why I’m a member of the AMA. And, while I have rocked-up to a decent number of the local networking sessions (run by our trusty West Midlands reps Amy and Tim), I’ve certainly never been what you could call an active participant in the association.
Until Tuesday.

For it was Tuesday that I trained-it up to Sheffield (along with ooooh, at least half a carriage-load of Brum-based arts marketers) to attend my first AMA Conference; this year spending 2 days focusing on ‘game-change’.

The theme was introduced by Jo Taylor, AMA Chair, whose opening keynote was warm, enthusiastic and motivating, making for a good start and reassuring me that the next couple of days could be a very good use of my time.

Over those days I learnt a great deal; agreed with lots of things; disagreed with others; understood more than I expected to; felt out-of-my depth at times; caught-up with people I know; met loads of new folks … and made plenty of notes which I’m busy turning into blog posts (one of which will explain this post’s title).

One of the main things that stood out to me was that an arts marketer’s role is invariably varied. Mix that with the ever-changing ways in which people are communicating, and the sector's already stretched finances becoming even tighter, and the result is that marketing departments – or those whose role includes marketing – are having to take on more and more responsibility. So, us being better at our jobs (making sure our projects run smoothly – and enjoyably) is becoming more and more important.

All-in-all it was an intense, thought-provoking, tiring and enlightening couple of days. So, that was the easy bit! Now for the tricksy task of helping to put some of these learnin’s into practice …

Design of the Year 2013

Categories: Inspiration, Learning things, Nice stuff, Useful/interesting



Image: Design Museum

Tomorrow, the Design Museum will announce the over-all winner of Design of the Year 2013 – a celebration of the past year's very best Architecture, Digital, Fashion, Furniture, Graphics, Product and Transport design.

The winner will be chosen from this shortlist of category winners:

Architecture: Tour Bois-Le-Prêtre, Paris / Designed by Frédéric Druot, Anne Lacaton and Jean-Philippe Vassal

Digital: gov.uk / Designed by Government Digital Service

Fashion: Diana Vreeland: The Eye Has to Travel / Directed by Lisa Immordino Vreeland

Furniture: Medici chair / Designed by Konstantin Grcic for Mattiazzi

Graphics: Venice Architecture Biennale identity / Designed by John Morgan Studio

Product: Kit Yamoyo / Designed by ColaLife and PI Global

Transport: Morph folding wheel / Designed by Vitamins for Maddak Inc.

As a graphic designer, I obviously have a particular interest in the Graphics and Digital categories. John Morgan Studio's brand identity for the Venice Architecture Biennale is just my sort of thing; simple, elegant, well-executed and, once you've seen it, there could be no other solution. It's perfect. And James big-upped (bigged-up?) the government's new website not so long ago in this blog post – and it is a fantastic example of simple, thoughtful, useful design. But neither of these would be my Design of the Year.

Although I'm a fan of Heatherwick Studio's Olympic Cauldron which was longlisted in the Product category, my personal choice for Design of the Year is the one which took the cauldron out of the running – ColaLife's Kit Yamoyo.

Image: Simon Berry

An exceptionally deserving and clever category winner, each Kit Yamoyo contains single-dose packs of oral rehydration salts (diarrhoea is the second-biggest killer of under-5s in sub-Saharan Africa), and the wedge-shaped pods also double as measuring cups for adding the correct amount of water to dilute each sachet.

So, what's the link with cola? And why the weird shape? The pods are wedge-shaped to fit into the spaces between Coke bottles in crates, enabling them to be transported and distributed using Coca-Cola's extensive networks across the region. Ingenious!


A Kit Yamoyo promoter hands out vouchers to mothers. Image: Simon Berry

The story of how the idea came about is a must-read and, as the ColaLife folks say, "It must be the first time that an anti-diarrhoea kit takes centre stage as a design icon."

Design for good at its very best.

(I'll update this post with the official winner once the announcement's been made.)

UPDATE

And the *actual* winner is … gov.uk. Congratulations! (And kudos for getting a press release about the win sorted so quickly an' all.)

I stick by my personal choice of Kit Yamoyo, but the Government's new website was always James' pick; and there is something rather nice about a website winning this gong, I reckon. Especially as many of the GDS Team's (award-winning) design principles run through the work that we do – it's sound stuff!

If you want a closer look at the nominees, they're being exhibited at the Design Museum until 7th July. Although the winner can obviously be seen on an internet connection near you.

The power of television

Categories: Extra-curricular, Learning things, Our work, Silly

For the past couple of weeks, my Tuesday nights between 8pm and about 10pm have been spent monitoring the impact of television. This is not a round-about way of saying I've just been sat there watching the telebox – oh, no; this is work! (Ish)

The very talented Lauren is currently doing rather well on BBC2's The Great British Sewing Bee and, having built the website for her haberdashery Guthrie & Ghani (have a look at the case study), we decided to monitor visits in real-time as we anticipated a traffic spike while the show was on-air. And we were right … sort of.


The site was viewed on a range of different devices and, right, spot the episode spikes within 'hourly views'. Zoiks!

FUN FACTS:

  • There was a massive spike in visits on the day the first episode aired – although the following day actually saw an increase in daily visits to the website.
  • Even discounting the on-air spikes, average daily traffic to the site has increased by a whopping 1000% since the first episode.
  • Episode 2 encouraged 13% more visits than episode 1. (The second episode also got slightly higher ratings – 2.57m compared with last week's 2.56m.)
  • During the show, there were spikes in activity on the website just after Lauren appeared on-screen, and just after she tweeted – particularly if the tweet included a link to the site (unsurprisingly).
  • There was a noticeable increase in activity on Guthrie & Ghani during the programme's 'history of sewing' item … which, ummm, may perchance suggest that some folks aren't hugely enamoured with this part of the show?!

So our hypothesis was correct, that a prime-time TV show would impact the website while on-air – but what we hadn't anticipated was that the number of concurrent users would actually reach its peak about 10 minutes after the end of each programme. I guess it's not that surprising – as people rush to their computers once the show's finished to find out more – but not something that had occurred to us before it happened.

Same again next week – Lauren, pictured above with those troublesome trousers, is still in the running for the title Britain's Best Amateur Sewer (shame about that homonym). Be sure to watch the next installment of The Great British Sewing Bee, BBC2, Tuesday, 8pm to see how she gets on. 

And while you do that, remember I'll be sat on a sofa with the TV on but actually watching my laptop, tabbing repeatedly between umpteen browser windows monitoring real-time stats, following who's tweeting what … and no doubt subconsciously learning a bit about sewing at the same time. That is the power of televsion.